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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 5:56 am 
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LTW Supporter
LTW Supporter

Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2005 8:43 pm
Posts: 283
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
Hi guys.... Its been a WHILE!
I have been unable to get to the internet much and am finally back
home for good.... Time to get back on top of those customs where my
name came up but I wasnt around.

OK
Been getting ready to get a custom scout rifle (really leaning towards Jim Brockman for this)
I have a pre 64 model 70 308 I was planning on running BUT I got an idea....
Right handed Blaser R 93 with the Bolt on the L side (quicker follow up shot as you maintain
your trigger grip (of course not trigger hold) and just have to reestablish your front grip. Also as it is a straight pull back it
is quicker for follow up shots)
Forget cost of the rifle itself.

What are your thoughts on this???

Please give me what you feel the pros and cons of each are.

Also, I will be using a 12.5 LOP stock most likely as I am a smaller guy and am partial to shorter rifles.

I am think of doing a red dot (perhaps eotech, a leupold scout scope and I am leaning towards something night force with the lit optic for low light shots. at some distance. (Id be doing his premier package as it gives mounts for the scout and a forward mounted scope)

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Kentucky Colonel, Tennessee Squire & Combat Leprechaun
"You won't rise to the occasion - you'll default to your level of training." Barrett Tillman


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:44 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 21, 2005 7:30 pm
Posts: 72
Frankly I think the "Scout Rifle" concept is weak and without merit. my opinion only.

Modern red dot or heads up sights have replaced the need for a scope mounted way out yonder. I find the mounts on the barrel to be counter intuitive when one looks at barrel expansion from heat. It can lead to an unbalanced weapon in the hand, and frankly its not as fast as a good peep sight.

Just not my cuppa.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:25 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 45
Location: Texas
I love the R93 and believe that it is a rifle without peer for the hunter; especially the traveling hunter.

Give me a list of questions and I'll do my best to answer. Otherwise, check out www.blaserpro.com


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 9:24 am 
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Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 11:54 pm
Posts: 7
J - I've tried this years ago at school w/ a right-handed bolt with a low power conventional scope. FWIW, the pros are: 1) more accurate than I am, 2) very fast cycling possible, 3) light weight. The cons are: 1) VERY stiff safety [due to the striker design] that made it slow to come off sling carry or from low ready, 2) low magazine capacity, 3) no BUIS [this can be remedied by ordering barrel w/ fixed sights]. In my opinion, none of the cons really matter for a hunting rifle; it's really a matter of what your purpose is for the rifle. Btw, Jim Brockman was at that class R&Ding one of his rifles for a customer. Very nice and practical rifle; not eye candy. Hope this helps. Let us know what you end up getting.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 5:16 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:45 pm
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Location: Texas
Ray Z wrote:
J - I've tried this years ago at school w/ a right-handed bolt with a low power conventional scope. FWIW, the pros are: 1) more accurate than I am, 2) very fast cycling possible, 3) light weight. The cons are: 1) VERY stiff safety [due to the striker design] that made it slow to come off sling carry or from low ready, 2) low magazine capacity, 3) no BUIS [this can be remedied by ordering barrel w/ fixed sights]. In my opinion, none of the cons really matter for a hunting rifle; it's really a matter of what your purpose is for the rifle. Btw, Jim Brockman was at that class R&Ding one of his rifles for a customer. Very nice and practical rifle; not eye candy. Hope this helps. Let us know what you end up getting.



Just to your #1 con: One you get the feel for the safety (it is different) it's every bit as fast as a traditional safety.

#2 is true though and it can't really be helped.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:46 pm 
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Rider,
You probably have more practice with it than I do. When I hold the rifle at high ready with thumb on the safety, I didn't find there to be much of a difference in disengaging the safety. However, when carrying the slung rifle or if approaching with it in low ready in reaction to a verbal or visual, I'm faster with both the W70 or R700 style safeties. Like I said before, it doesn't matter much for hunting.
One more issue that's more operator error than design error has to do with the ease of the straight pull action. When working the action very quickly under stress, I and another Blaser shooter in the class would on sometimes, but not frequently, slam the bolt forward without full engagement. With a conventional bolt rifle, the pull down of the bolt handle gives a physical confirmation that helps me. This may be a training/practice issue and unimportant to J.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2009 1:10 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:45 pm
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Location: Texas
Ray Z wrote:
Rider,
You probably have more practice with it than I do. When I hold the rifle at high ready with thumb on the safety, I didn't find there to be much of a difference in disengaging the safety. However, when carrying the slung rifle or if approaching with it in low ready in reaction to a verbal or visual, I'm faster with both the W70 or R700 style safeties. Like I said before, it doesn't matter much for hunting.
One more issue that's more operator error than design error has to do with the ease of the straight pull action. When working the action very quickly under stress, I and another Blaser shooter in the class would on sometimes, but not frequently, slam the bolt forward without full engagement. With a conventional bolt rifle, the pull down of the bolt handle gives a physical confirmation that helps me. This may be a training/practice issue and unimportant to J.


Both are training issues IMO;

I have swung my rifle off my shoulder, disengaged the safety, dropped to a knee and taken a shot on a running deer (and dropped it) in less than a second. Obviously, this is unscientific but if there was ever a "fast draw competition" with a 10 pt buck this was it.

And yes, one must forcefully close the bolt. Again, it's a habit that must be trained.


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